Newborn Babies and Temperature: 3 Things You Need To Know

Being a parent of a newborn can be so stressful. There are so many things you need to know. Being educated about newborn babies and temperature is vital.

Being a parent of a newborn can be so stressful. There are so many things you need to know. Being educated about newborn babies and temperature is vital.

Newborn Babies and Temperature: 3 Things You Need To Know

~This is a collaboration post.

 

The early months of a baby’s life are some of the happiest times you will ever experience as a parent – but they can also be among the most worrying. Newborns have unique, special needs that can make those early sleep-deprived months feel all the more challenging. Your protective instincts kick into overdrive and you seek to do all you can to protect this precious new life.

 

There is a lot to think about for parents of newborns, from managing sleep deprivation to establishing a schedule – but there is one area that is often overlooked: temperature. To ensure you have access to all the information you need to care for your newborn, below, you will find a simple guide to three reasons why temperature is a consideration you may want to take into account.

 

#1 – Newborns Struggle to Regulate their Temperature

 

Newborns cannot maintain a stable body temperature as older children and adults can. Take the time to assess the climate and season your newborn will experience. For example, if your baby will be born in summer, it’s likely you’ll need to focus on keeping their environment cool; the reverse is true if your baby is due in winter. As newborns cannot regulate their own temperatures as well as adults, it’s important to examine your air conditioning, plumbing and heating options at home when preparing for your baby’s arrival. However, there is an extra factor to consider…

 

#2 – There is a Link Between Room Heat and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)

 

There is no singular cause of SIDS, but there does appear to be a link between the warmth of a baby’s sleeping environment and their risk factors. If you bring your baby home during winter, it can be tempting to try and protect them by keeping them as warm as possible, but it’s best to aim for a room temperature of around 68°F – 72°F; warm, but not hot.

 

#3 – Learn Your Baby’s Normal Body Temperature

 

So far we’ve focused on environmental temperatures, but there’s another type of temperature that requires additional focus: body temperature.

Adults tend to know roughly what our body temperature should be (around 98.6°F). But, the same cannot be said for newborns. You may find that your newborn’s internal temperature is prone to fluctuations. It can potentially be by as much as a degree or two. This can make it difficult to judge if they have a fever. It’s therefore helpful to take their temperature regularly so you can establish what’s normal for your baby so you can note any big changes.

A healthy temperature for a newborn is between 97°F and 100.4°F; it can be helpful to establish if your baby tends to run a little hot or a little cold. This makes it easier to monitor changes. If their temperature falls outside of the aforementioned range, seek medical advice immediately.

 

In Conclusion

 

Temperature – both in environmental terms and from the point of view of overall body temperature – can be tricky. Hopefully, these tips will help you plan your home and habits. Accommodation and extra focus on newborn babies and temperature are very important.

 

Being a parent of a newborn can be so stressful. There are so many things you need to know. Being educated about newborn babies and temperature is vital.

 

Michele is a Family Life Educator. She is a mom to 5 kids and loves helping others strengthen their families! When she is not blogging she is spending time with her family and running around drinking Diet Coke trying to get everything done!

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